Robotic Kidney Surgery

Robotic Partial Nephrectomy

Solid renal masses are malignant 90% of the time.  The treatment of these has historically been a radical nephrectomy.  This operation consists of the removal of the kidney, adrenal gland, part of the ureter, and the fat and lymph nodes around the kidney.

As more has been learned about the behavior of kidney tumors, radical nephrectomies are often not necessary for smaller tumors and partial nephrectomies can provide the same cure rates.

Small solid renal masses less than 4 cm can often be treated by removing only a small part of the kidney.  Many studies have proven that the cure rates with a partial nephrectomy are similar to removing the whole kidney.  Traditionally these operations were performed through a large incision.

Laparoscopy has been used to treat some of these masses when the location is on the outer part of the kidney.  This operation involves temporarily stopping the blood supply to the kidney, removing the tumor, and suturing the kidney after the tumor is removed.  It is feasible to perform these operations with the laparoscope, but it must be done quickly since the time the blood supply is kept from the kidney must be minimized.

Robotic Partial Nephrectomy may provide all the advantages of the minimally invasive procedure with improved accuracy in excising the tumor and provide a shorter time the kidney is not receiving blood.

Dr. Savatta performed the first robotic partial nephrectomy in New Jersey in May of 2005 with the assistance of Dr. Galdieri.

Robotic Radical Nephrectomy

When kidney tumors are too large, or located close to the middle of the kidney, urologists may need to remove the entire kidney.  Robotic Radical Nephrectomy can be performed with the Davinci Robot for the treatment of these kidney masses.  This is usually preformed through the front (transperitoneal).

Dr. Savatta has converted most of his kidney removal surgery from laparoscopy and hand assist laparoscopy for larger tumors to robotic nephrectomies.

The introduction of the daVinci S robot has allowed a much larger range of motion and the ability to perform minimally invasive surgery for larger tumors.

Dr. Savatta performed the first live telecast for intuitive surgical’s AUA exhibit in May of 2007 in front of an international crowd of 300 physicians.

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